Dune Grass Plantings

Another weekend, another dune grass planting.  A few thousand more dune grass plants are now in the dunes in Lavallette, NJ thanks to volunteers, the town of Lavallette, NJ and the Jersey Shore Chapter of Surfrider Foundation who purchased some of the grass.  Dune grass holds the sand in place.  Fully vegetated dunes keep windblown sand from getting passed, and they are much better at resisting wave attach in storms.

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Dutch Team Helping Rebuild By Design

Raritan Bayshore – September 20, 2013 – Asbury Park Press Article by Ken Serrano

Henk Ovink knows something about how to keep the ocean at bay.

Hailing from the Netherlands, which started flood planning some 800 years ago, he served as the second in charge of a department in the Dutch government that deals with planning and water.

Now on loan to the U.S. government, Ovink arrived on the Bayshore Thursday with teams of engineers, architects, planners and scientists to learn how the locals live and to come up with better ideas to combat hurricanes and flooding.

“You’re facing something we’ve been facing for ages,” he said.

Ovink is heading Rebuild by Design, a federally funded program that has 10 transnational teams working on ways to shore up areas at risk from extreme weather. Watch the video above to learn more about the program. Full article here.

Watchdog: Some seek buyouts of flooded properties

Written by Todd Bates

Original article can be read at: http://www.app.com/article/20130303/NJNEWS2001/303030013/Some-seek-buyouts-flooded-properties?gcheck=1

Floodwaters flowed into Fran O’Connor’s low-lying Sayreville home three times in the past three years, with devastating results.

The first two storms – a March 2010 nor’easter and Tropical Storm Irene in August 2011 – brought about 4 to 5 feet of water into the house. But that was just a warm-up to superstorm Sandy, when at least 10 feet of water inundated the home.

“It actually looked like a war zone here after the storm,” said O’Connor, 54, a 16-year resident of hard-hit Weber Avenue. “The entire contents of everyone’s homes was ripped out and piled up on the curb of their houses.” …

Time to Remove Beach Homes

Inquirer Editorial: Time to Remove Beach Homes

March 29, 2013

A broken house on the beach in Mantoloking, N.J. (APRIL SAUL / Staff Photographer)

Gov. Christie is wisely setting aside $250 million in post-Sandy federal relief funds to buy out homeowners in flood-prone areas. But he should do more.

Christie’s premise is sound: to remove buildings repeatedly damaged by storms, which cost tax payers and property owners when they have to be replaced or repaired. The answer is to return the land to a floodplain and attempt to restore vital wetlands and sand dunes that could help mitigate future damage. However, this developing program must be tightly focused on the most vulnerable areas, and it needs more money. New York plans to spend $400 million in a similar effort.

The administration doesn’t expect many barrier-island property owners to take advantage of the program. But that disappointing outcome could be avoided by sweetening the deal with additional incentives – in particular for those homes and businesses on narrow sand spits with a few swamp reeds, a bay in the back, and an ocean view out front, as well as buildings along narrow causeways through the marshes.

Read complete article here.

 

Christie’s Buyout Program

N.J. Governor Vows Buyout of Residents Flooded in Sandy

March 27, 2013
By Sergio Bichao – Courier News

MIDDLESEX BOROUGH, N.J. — By the end of next week, New Jersey should know whether it can set aside $250 million of the state’s $60 billion Sandy relief allocation to buy perennially flooded homes and turn them into public open spaces, Gov. Chris Christie said.

If it happens, the governor promised a Sayreville, N.J., resident who lost her home to the hurricane that state officials will come to her neighborhood to discuss buying out flooded property owners.

View video & read complete article here.

Letter to the Editor

Letter: After Sandy, let’s rethink restoring the Shore

March 26, 2013
Opinion – APP Letter to the Editor

A wise and educated young lady, Lucille Zipf, wrote a compelling and thought-provoking column (Asbury Park Press, March 22, “Restoring old Shore a mistake”). Her words gave me cause to pause and reflect, for I also love the Jersey Shore.

I have been a “Jersey Girl” for most of my adult life, but my stomping grounds were North Jersey until retiring to Barnegat in 2005.

At 16, I fell in love with my husband and now 50 years have passed and Lucille’s article brought back all the happy memories of our dating years and day trips to the Shore.

Read complete letter here.

Rutgers Tool Simulates the Realities of Sea-Level Rise

Jon Hurdle | March 19, 2013

Original article can be read at: http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/13/03/18/rutgers-tool-simulates-the-realities-of-sea-level-rise/

Online application makes it easy to see at a glance what parts of Jersey Shore will drown if ocean levels climb

At Point Pleasant Coast Guard Station, the rising ocean laps just below the quayside where cars are parked. At Avalon Dunes, it’s shown advancing along a bayside street lined with expensive homes. And at Double Creek Bridge south of Toms River, the waters of the Atlantic creep toward a beachfront house that’s already just yards from the regular high-tide line.

All three scenarios are depicted in photographs simulating the effects of a foot rise in sea-level on the Jersey Shore. These simulations — and others — can be seen thanks to a new online mapping tool published by Rutgers University to help local officials plan for coastal flooding in coming decades.

Some four months after Hurricane Sandy dramatically raised public concern about the power of the ocean, Rutgers officials are alerting government officials, businesses, and individuals to the likely effects of rising seas on their roads, bridges, beaches, docks, homes, and communities.

As ocean volume increase in response to rising global temperatures and melting polar ice caps, the average high-tide level around New Jersey’s coast is likely to be one foot higher than at present by 2050, according to a consensus of national and regional forecasts compiled by Rutgers.

Rutgers’ online tool makes it possible to simulate how increases in sea level will affect parts of the Jersey Shore, such as Lake Como.

That’s about twice as high as the global average because the mid-Atlantic coast is sinking at the same time that waters are rising, creating an especially urgent problem for low-lying areas of coastal Jersey and Delaware — where state officials have forecast up to 11 percent of the land mass could be inundated by three feet of water by 2100.

In an attempt to illustrate the practical effects of a phenomenon that may seem like a long-term abstraction, the mapping tool shows users how some locations would be affected at high tide by specific levels of sea-level rise.

The website invites users to simulate between one and six feet of sea-level rise by using a sliding scale and then to watch the impact of that manipulation on photographs of familiar locations and on local and statewide maps.

At Lake Como, a park bench some distance from the current level the water becomes a tiny island as a user adjusts the slider to three feet, a level that many climate scientists believe will be normal by the end of the century. At West Point Island Bridge near Tom’s River, a steel barrier beside a channel is submerged when the user simulates a four-foot rise in waters.

“While sea-level rise is a global phenomenon, adapting to its impacts is a local decision-making challenge that is going to require site-specific remedies,” said Richard Lathrop, a professor of environmental sciences at Rutgers. “Our goal is to spur long-range planning and adaptation measures. We see the tool as a first step for individual communities to be able to visualize potential vulnerabilities.”

The tool highlights the vulnerabilities of schools, hospitals, fire stations, and evacuation routes to different water levels.

In Cape May County, for example, the map shows schools at Avalon, Stone Harbor, and Wildwood would be submerged as the barrier islands flood beneath a three-foot rise in sea level. In Monmouth County, hospitals in Red Bank and Long Branch would be threatened by the same degree of sea-level rise, the tool indicates.

It also shows Federal Emergency Management Agency projections of what areas of New Jersey are vulnerable under so-called 100-year and 500-year flood projections, or floods so severe that they are deemed to be likely to occur only once in 100 or 500 years.

A swath of the coast from Tom’s River to Cape May and then up the Delaware Bay shore toward Philadelphia is susceptible to 100-year floods, while smaller areas on the Atlantic coast are subject to 500-year floods, according to FEMA’s projections on the mapping tool.

But the FEMA scenario is based on current sea levels and doesn’t take into account any future sea-level rise, Lathrop said. The agency, along with the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration, is working on a revised model that may be published in coming months, he said.

FEMA’s flood elevations are used as baselines by the National Flood Insurance Program, which insures residents of flood-prone areas. They also govern the state’s ability to determine where development may occur in relation to those areas.

Local and county officials haven’t commented since the tool was published in early March, Lathrop said, but some were involved in its planning, which took about three years.

Lisa Auermuller, watershed coordinator for the Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve, which is managed by Rutgers, coordinated with local officials and sought their feedback.

“We didn’t assume that ‘if we build it, they will come,’” Auermuller said in a statement. “We listened to what they wanted, and included that in the project so we knew the finished product would be useful.”

Rebuild the Right Way (Audio)

Rebuild The Right Way After Sandy Or Pay The Price [AUDIO]

March 19, 2013
NJ 101.5 – Written by Kevin McArdle – Mark Wilson, Getty Image

New Jerseyans have very clear and very strong opinions on rebuilding after Superstorm Sandy.

They also think anyone who ignores federal advice about rebuilding should face serious consequences. That’s just a portion of the results from the most recent Fairleigh Dickinson University-PublicMind poll released this morning.

“By an almost two-to-one margin poll respondents told us property owners should be required to rebuild in a way that makes their dwelling better protected rather than allowing homeowners to rebuild in whatever manner they choose,” explains Krista Jenkins, Director of PublicMind and professor of political science at Fairleigh Dickinson University. “Also by about a two-to-one margin people believe that a failure to heed the advice of FEMA when rebuilding should result in a forfeiture of federal assistance for property owners if another big storm damages their property or wipes it out as opposed to allowing them to recoup their losses.”

Read complete article or listen to audio here.

Sea Level Rise

RUTGERS TOOL SIMULATES THE REALITIES OF SEA-LEVEL RISE

March 19, 2013
Written by Jon Hurdle

Online application makes it easy to see at a glance what parts of Jersey Shore will drown if ocean levels climb

At Point Pleasant Coast Guard Station, the rising ocean laps just below the quayside where cars are parked. At Avalon Dunes, it’s shown advancing along a bayside street lined with expensive homes. And at Double Creek Bridge south of Toms River, the waters of the Atlantic creep toward a beachfront house that’s already just yards from the regular high-tide line.

All three scenarios are depicted in photographs simulating the effects of a foot rise in sea-level on the Jersey Shore. These simulations — and others — can be seen thanks to a new online mapping tool published by Rutgers University to help local officials plan for coastal flooding in coming decades.

Read complete article here.